Student Success Story – Devonna Taylor, MRI Technologist

I loved MCC’s MRI Technology program. It challenged me to expand my mind, to think outside the box and to grow my potential. Throughout the program, I focused and paid attention to every detail, and I asked questions to make sure I understood what was being taught. To be a great MRI technician, I needed to know the machines inside and out and to learn the many ways to position the patient and many sequences that can be run.

I didn’t have a traditional career path. I dropped out of high school my senior year, but the next year I got my GED and then went to a college to study medical billing and coding. I finished the program in 18 months and got certified. Over the next five years I worked for two major insurance companies doing medical and dental claims work.

I enjoyed what I did, but I knew that I wanted to work more in direct patient care. I wanted to do something more, be more involved and challenge my mind. By studying MRI technology, I’m now able to help people who are sick, to see what’s going on inside their bodies, and have a positive impact on their well-being.

The MRI technology program opens up many future pathways for me. In five years, I hope to be the head of an MRI department and to have a specialization in pediatrics or neurology. Ultimately, I would like to become a radiologist, the doctor who interprets x-rays.

The options at MCC surprised me. Their evening and weekend schedules were great for my full-time work schedule and helped me maintain a good balance between work, school and my personal life. I live in Bourbonnais, Ill., which is about 60 miles south of MCC’s downtown campus. So traveling here each week was a challenge, but I wanted to do it to attend MCC.

I considered going to my local community college, but I didn’t want to be just another community college student.

I’m proud of my work ethic and the ambition I’ve shown during the program. There were times during my studies that I wanted to give up because I didn’t think I could make it. I didn’t let this become an excuse not to come to school and to not move forward. At times, I felt like my back was against the wall and that I might quit. But now I’m on the honor roll, I have a great externship lined up, and I’m planning for graduation.

If you’re thinking about going back to school but find yourself saying that you can do it later, keep in mind that “later” can turn into five, ten or fifteen years. My advice is that you should just do it. Pray, have hope and faith, and never give up.

 

-Devonna Taylor, Associate of Applied Science in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Technology